Policy makers and Funders

Navigation

Resources

By  Janice Elliott (Public Policy Forum, Canada) Sara Heesterbeek (Rathenau Institute, The Netherlands) Carolyn J. Lukensmeyer (Global Voices, USA) Nikki Slocum (United Nations University - Comparative Regional Integration Studies)
By  EPSRC Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council
By  Living Knowledge: the International Science Shop Network
Intended audience Librarians and Repository managers, PHD Students, Policy makers and Funders, Project Managers, Research Administration, Researchers and Students
Level: Introductory: no previous knowledge is required

This course helps you to understand open business models and responsible research and innovation (RRI) and illustrates how these can foster innovation. By the end of the course, you will:

  • understand key concepts and values of open business models and and responsible research and innovation
  • know how to plan your innovation activities
  • be able to use Creative Commons licenses in business
  • under...
Intended audience Librarians and Repository managers, PHD Students, Policy makers and Funders, Project Managers, Publishers, Researchers and Students, Research Administration
Level: Introductory: no previous knowledge is required

This course introduces you to open peer review (OPR), an emerging practice which is gaining momentum as part of Open Science. Upon completing this course, you will:

  • understand what OPR means and how it supports Open Science
  • be aware of OPR workflows and which aspects of the review process can be conducted openly
  • know how to write a constructive and responsible open peer review 
  • know ab...
Intended audience Librarians and Repository managers, PHD Students, Policy makers and Funders, Publishers, Project Managers, Researchers and Students, Research Administration
Level: Introductory: no previous knowledge is required

This course shows you how sharing preprints can improve your research and support Open Science. By the end of the course, you will:

  • know what preprints are
  • be able to find a suitable preprints platform to share your early findings
  • understand the pro and cons of sharing preprints
  • be aware of how sharing preprints can benefit your career progression
Intended audience Librarians and Repository managers, PHD Students, Policy makers and Funders, Project Managers, Publishers, Researchers and Students
Level: Introductory: no previous knowledge is required

This course helps you to become skilled in Open Access (OA) publishing in the context of Open Science. By the end of the course, you will:

  • understand how to publish your work openly and be aware of the advantages
  • be able to find an OA publisher for your research
  • know how to find a suitable repository to provide OA and archive your work
  • know how to publish OA monographs
  • understand...
Intended audience Librarians and Repository managers, PHD Students, Policy makers and Funders, Project Managers, Research Administration, Researchers and Students
Level: Introductory: no previous knowledge is required

This course covers data protection in particular and ethics more generally. It will help you understand the basic principles of data protection and introduces techniques for implementing data protection in your research processes. Upon completing this course, you will know:

  • what personal data are and how you can protect them
  • what to consider when developing consent forms
  • how to store your data securel...
Intended audience Librarians and Repository managers, PHD Students, Policy makers and Funders, Project Managers, Publishers, Research Administration, Researchers and Students
Level: Introductory: no previous knowledge is required

This course introduces Open Source Software (OSS) management and workflow as an emerging but critical component of Open Science. The course explains the role of software sharing and sustainability in reproducibility, trust and longevity, and provides different perspectives around the sharing and reuse of computational code and methods, namely the software producer, the software reuser, and the non-coder with an interest either in reproducin...

Intended audience PHD Students, Policy makers and Funders, Research Administration, Researchers and Students, Publishers, Librarians and Repository managers
Level: Introductory: no previous knowledge is required

Data-driven research is becoming increasingly common in a wide range of academic disciplines, from Archaeology to Zoology, and spanning Arts and Science subject areas alike. To support good research, we need to ensure that researchers have access to good data. Upon completing this course, you will:

  • understand which data you can make open and which need to be protected
  • know how to go about writing a data manageme...